Baikal queen: the Famous Ringed Seals and Their Pups

The Day of Young Seals Protection is celebrated on March 15 around the world. The date is celebrated on the initiative of the International Fund for Animal Welfare founded by Brian Davis in 1969. The Fund has managed to achieve a total ban on the commercial hunt for Greenland seals and their pups.

The Baikal ringed seal still officially remains a commercial species and is not even listed in the Red Book, but the hunt for it was officially banned in 1980. An annual quota for the industrial hunt of 50 animals has been established until 2009. The current number of ringed seals is estimated at about 130 animals. The issue of removing the ban on commercial and private hunt for Baikal seals is being debated nowadays.

Meanwhile, the public is actively opposed to the idea of ban removal. 

Baikal queen: the Famous Ringed Seals and Their Pups
Baikal queen: the Famous Ringed Seals and Their Pups
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Baikal queen: the Famous Ringed Seals and Their Pups

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Baikal queen: the Famous Ringed Seals and Their Pups

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Baikal queen: the Famous Ringed Seals and Their Pups

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